Askeaton Contemporary Arts

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SUSAN MACWILLIAM

IC ITE OID

Susan MacWilliam was commissioned to present Askeaton Contemporary Arts’ entry in the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade. For many years, MacWilliam has explored cases of paranormal and perceptual phenomena through her video works and installations. Her project, IC ITE OID, develops from her recent residency in Askeaton and interweaves elements of Aldous Huxley’s seminal 1954 novel The Doors of Perception with accounts of the Limerick Meteorite Fall of 1813.

“Yesterday morning about nine o’clock, there was most dreadful thunder heard in the direction from Patrick’s Well, towards Adare and Rathkeale, in this County; the peals were very violent and continued for a considerable time, and were accompanied with some awful appearances –large fragments of atmospheric stones, and other circumstances, which indicated some very serious concussion to have taken place.” - The Limerick Chronicle, Saturday September 11, 1813

 

 

ALLAN HUGHES- PRELUDE TO

THE ASKEATON COMMUNE
Next year Askeaton Contemporary Arts will present The Askeaton Commune, a series of new artist commissions to coincide with the centenary of the Easter Rising and the founding of the Irish State. The programme aims to emphasise the pursuit of cultural equality and egalitarianism within the social infrastructures we now inhabit, making public a series of individual and subjective positions, scenarios increasingly vetoed in favour of neoliberal initiatives of regional branding and consumer-led views of culture.

Leading up to this event, Allan Hughes’ project Neutral States is presented at Askeaton Civic Trust. Set around the legacy of Second World War battlement infrastructure along the Shannon Estuary, Hughes' video, audio and photographic installation examines ideas of the ‘neutral state’, not solely as it pertains to the neutrality of Ireland during the Second World War, but also as an exploratory idea of historical memory and site as an ever-evolving understanding. Neutral States is developed from interviews made with Michael Foley, John Guinane and Michael D. Ryan, all volunteers in the Local Security Force (LSF) and Local Defense Force (LDF) in the 1940s.

MARCH 16 - MAY 29 (Mon-Fri, 10-5, and by appointment)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the Neighbourhood

10th edition - JULY 2015

The tenth edition of Welcome to the Neighbourhood, an annual programme of invited artists and cultural practioneers resident and working in Askeaton occurs this July. Artists announced are:

SAM KEOGH

QUIM PACKARD

DEIRDRE O'MAHONY

MAYA SCHWEIZER

 

SAVE THE DATE - OPEN DAY, CURATORIAL TOUR AND SPECIAL 10th ANNIVERSARY HELLFIRE CLUB PARTY –

Saturday, 25 July from 3pm

 

 

SEANIE BARRON:

For decades, Seanie Barron has been carving and shaping wood in a workshop at the back of his house in Plunkett Road, Askeaton. Initially, his work might be labeled as folk art, yet on further inspection it becomes apparent that his work is instead borne out of an understanding of nature and often-humorous interpretations of the environment around him. He roams around Askeaton, looking for the right branch left in a field or underneath a bush, to then shape into a walking stick. These often take on surreal forms referencing seahorses, weasels, fists, foxes or swimmers. By channeling all from the overlooked to the exotic, Barron has spent years working on a form of art that, though may come from an untrained hand, is as relevant as any didactical form of creativity.

Ahead of his upcoming exhibition at the Douglas Hyde Gallery in Dublin, read his recent exhibition catalogue with an essay by Christa-Maria Lerm Hayes and an in-depth interview with Seanie Barron and Michele Horrigan.

Availible to download for free here

 

 

FROM THE ARCHIVE

THE HELLFIRE CLUB - Publication

A series of commissions in 2012 based upon the presence of an 18th century secret society house in Askeaton. Today, the building is inaccessible to the public, as a ruin in constant danger of collapse.

Around this site of physical decay, featured artists have considered the Hellfire history, its non-conformist allusions to the society of the 1700s, and its material presence as a crumbling ruin in the middle of a small Irish countryside town. New commissons are detailed in the publication, alongside texts from Michele Horrigan, Padraic E. Moore and Brian O’Doherty.

Available to download for free here

 
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